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EVO 2012 Thoughts

By Jeff Buckland, 7/9/2012 9:03 AM

Another year of fighting game hype has come and gone with EVO 2012 rounding up the "season" of tournaments and events. Korean players are on their way up, with MCZ Infiltrator taking first place the Street Fighter IV AE 2012 and CafeID Mad Kof taking the King of Fighters XIII top prize. Northern California's Filipino Champ squeaked out some very tough wins against many top players to take on Infrit in the Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 grand finals, and barely got through that too, coming back from losers bracket 3-2... to win the final set (you guessed it) 3-2. All the results are over at Shoryuken, and you can find archive videos of pretty much all the tournament footage (of which there are many hours) over on the SRKEvo Twitch.tv page.

I've heard a lot of talk about how other countries like Mexico, Korea, and of course Japan are just wrecking American players at these tournaments, and while I don't fully agree with that sentiment, I do agree with at least some of the reasons why: that players from those countries share their knowledge with each other, while American players are too busy trying to beast on each other at local tournaments to help each other get better at the games they're playing.

And you could see that, too, because in the top 8 brackets of nearly every game, American players didn't seem to respect each other much unless they were already good friends. But when two guys from the same foreign country had to go at it, there was a lot of mutual respect shown between the two players.

It is interesting to note that Filipino Champ, the UMVC3 champion, was not hiding his technology and knowledge. His stream at Twitch runs almost constantly, and people have seen the work he's been putting into the game for months now. Maybe this is a good sign that people shouldn't be so afraid of letting their secrets known, because if you can pull out clutch play and masterful execution without dropping combos constantly - and the other guy can't manage that - then it doesn't matter how much he knows about the character matchups or your particular style.


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